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Modelling both conducting and permeable states of cell membranes submitted to electric pulses

STSM by Clair Poignard, Researcher

Period of mission: from 04/02/2013 to 09/02/2013

Home institution: INRIA, Bordeaux, France

Host institution: Bioelectrics Group, IHM KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany

Current models of electroporation describe electroporation as an increase of membrane conductivity. Such an approach seemed to us rather inappropriate since most experimental observations indicate that the conducting state of the membrane and the permeabilised state cannot be identified. Experiments of Zimmerman et al. (J Membr Biol, 1979) at the end of the seventies suggested that the conducting state lasts only few microseconds after the pulse delivery, while the membrane remains permeabilised several minutes afterwards. This is the reason why the team MC2 of INRIA is developing new models that describe almost separately the two phenomena. Experiments from KIT have provided most significant information on the conducting state. The first important result obtained during the STSM relies on the link between high transmembrane voltage and pore creation. In the most highly developed models of Krassowska et al. (Biophys J, 1999) the dynamics of the pore creation is proportional to the factor: exp((1-q)(V/Vep)2).
Such dynamics implies that as soon as the transmembrane threshold value (Vep) is reached, the pores almost immediately open, leading to a drop of the transmembrane voltage. On the contrary, the experiments of KIT on transmembrane potential measurement showed a quite smooth behaviour of the transmembrane voltage during the pulse delivery, suggesting that the membrane response to the pulse has its intrinsic dynamics. The second important result concerns the link between the data obtained by patch-clamp and the modelling. By applying low voltage pulses in the physiological range to cell membranes, patch-clamp data provide estimates of the membrane conductivity and capacity at rest, i.e. before the electroporation. For higher voltage pulses, measurement of the current increase makes it possible to estimate the increase of the membrane conductivity due to the pore creation. Such data can thus directly be used to calibrate our models.

This report is also featured in the May 2013 newsletter available here.

Oral presentation(s) originating from this mission

Event 1st World Congress on Electroporation and Pulsed Electric Fields in Biology, Medicine and Food & Environmental Technologies
Location Portorož/Slovenia
Period 06/09 - 10/09/2015
Authors Aude Silve, Clair Poignard, Martin Sack, Ralf Straessner and Wolfgang Frey
Title Study of transmembrane voltage kinetics during 100 μs pulse using voltage sensitive dyes

Poster presentation(s) originating from this mission

Event 1st World Congress on Electroporation and Pulsed Electric Fields in Biology, Medicine and Food & Environmental Technologies
Location Portorož/Slovenia
Period

06/09 - 10/09/2015

Authors Aude Silve, Isabelle Leray, Clair Poignard and Lluis M Mir
Title Impact of external medium conductivity on cell membrane electropermeabilization by microsecond and nanosecond electric pulses

 


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