print small

Participating Countries:

Algeria

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Belgium

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bulgaria

Croatia

Czech Republic

Denmark

Finland

France

FYR of Macedonia

Germany

Greece

Iceland

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Lithuania

Morocco

Netherlands

New Zealand

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Russian Federation

Serbia

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Member area provided by LTFE
COST is supported by the EU Framework Programme Horizon 2020
This website is supported by COST
31/12/2014 (Added to site)
Author(s): Moir, J.; White, S. A.; French, J. J.; Littler, P.; Manas, D. M.

Systematic review of irreversible electroporation in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer

Journal: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, 40/12 (2014), pp. 1598-1604
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejso.2014.08.480
Request reprint  |  Tell your friend  | 

Abstract:

Background: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel procedure to combat pancreatic cancer, whereby high voltage pulses are delivered, resulting in cell death. This represents an ideal alternative to other thermal treatment modalities, as there is no overriding heat effect, therefore reducing the risk of injury to vessels and ducts.

Methods: Multiple databases were searched to January 2014. Primary outcome measures were survival and associated morbidity. 41 articles were initially identified; of these 4 studies met the inclusion criteria, yielding 74 patients in total.

Results: 94.5% of patients had locally advanced tumours, the remainder had metastatic disease. Treated tumour size ranged from 1 to 7 cm. IRE approach included open (70.3%), laparoscopic (2.7%) and percutaneous (27%; ultrasound-guided 30%, CT-guided 70%) Morbidity ranged from 0 to 33%; due to the high number of simultaneous procedures performed (resection/bypass) it was difficult to ascertain IRE-related complications. However no significant bleeding occurred when IRE-alone was performed. Survival statistics suggest a prognostic benefit. Reported survival included: 6 month survival of 40% (n = 5) and 70% (n = 14); PFS and OS 14 and 20 months respectively (n = 54). Results of most interest showed a significant survival benefit in matched IRE vs non-IRE groups (PFS 14 vs 6 mths; p = 0.01, OS 20 vs 11 mths; p = 0.03).

Conclusion: Initial evidence suggests IRE incurs a prognostic benefit with minimal morbidity. More high quality research is required to determine the role IRE may play in the multi-modal management of pancreatic cancers.



Project Office

Working groups

Steering Committee

Founding members

DC Rapporteurs

Related sites: