print small

Participating Countries:

Algeria

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Belgium

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bulgaria

Croatia

Czech Republic

Denmark

Finland

France

FYR of Macedonia

Germany

Greece

Iceland

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Lithuania

Morocco

Netherlands

New Zealand

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Russian Federation

Serbia

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Member area provided by LTFE
COST is supported by the EU Framework Programme Horizon 2020
This website is supported by COST
15/08/2014 (Added to site)
Author(s): Long, G.; Bakos, G.; Shires, P. K.; Gritter, L.; Crissman, J. W.; Harris, J. L.; Clymer, J. W.

Histological and Finite Element Analysis of Cell Death due to Irreversible Electroporation

Journal: Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment, 13/6 (2014), pp. 561-569
DOI: 10.7785/tcrtexpress.2013.600253
Tell your friend  | 

Abstract: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been shown to be an effective method of killing cells locally. In contrast to radiofrequency ablation, the mechanism by which cells are thought to die via IRE is the creation of pores in cell membranes, without substantial increase in ­tissue temperature. To determine the degree to which cell death is non-thermal, we evaluated IRE in porcine hepatocytes in vivo. Using pulse widths of 10 µs, bursts of 3 kV square-wave pulses were applied through a custom probe to the liver of an anesthetized pig. Affected ­tissue was evaluated histologically via stainings of hematoxylin & eosin (H&E), nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) to monitor cell respiration and TUNEL to gauge apoptosis. Temperature was measured during the application of electroporation, and heat transfer was modeled via finite element analysis. Cell death was calculated via Arrhenius kinetics. Four distinct zones were observed within the ring return electrode; heat-fixed tissue, coagulation, necrotic, and viable. The Arrhenius damage integral estimated complete cell death only in the first zone, where the temperature exceeded 70°C, and partial or no cell death in the other zones, where maximum temperature was approximately 45°C. Except for a limited area near the electrode tip, cell death in IRE is predominantly due to a non-thermal mechanism.



Project Office

Working groups

Steering Committee

Founding members

DC Rapporteurs

Related sites: