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25/10/2012 (Added to site)
Author(s): Garcia-Sanchez, T.; Sanchez-Ortiz, B.; Vila, I.; Guitart, M.; Rosell, J.; Gomez-Foix, A. M.; Bragos, R.

Design and Implementation of a Microelectrode Assembly for Use o Noncontact In Situ Electroporation of Adherent Cells

Journal: Journal of Membrane Biology, 245 (2012), pp. 617-624
DOI: 10.1007/s00232-012-9474-y
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Abstract: In situ electroporation of adherent cells provides significant advantages with respect to electroporation systems for suspension cells, such as causing minimal stress to cultured cells and simplifying and saving several steps within the process. In this study, a new electrode assembly design is shown and applied to in situ electroporate adherent cell lines growing in standard multiwell plates. We designed an interdigitated array of electrodes patterned on copper with printed circuit board technology and covered with nickel/gold. Small interelectrode distances were used to achieve effective electroporation with low voltages. Epoxy-based microseparators were constructed to avoid direct contact with the cells and to create more uniform electric fields. The device was successful in the electropermeabilization of two different adherent cell lines, C2C12 and HEK 293, as assessed by the intracellular delivery of the fluorescent dextran FD20S. Additionally, as a collateral effect, we observed cell electrofusion in HEK 293 cells, thus making this device also useful for performing cell fusion. In summary, we show the effectiveness of this minimally invasive device for electroporation of adherent cells cultured in standard multiwell plates. The cheap technologies used in the fabrication process of the electrode assembly indicate potential use as a low-cost, disposable device.


Keywords: adherent cell    electroporation    in situ    microelectrode   

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