print small

Participating Countries:

Algeria

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Belgium

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bulgaria

Croatia

Czech Republic

Denmark

Finland

France

FYR of Macedonia

Germany

Greece

Iceland

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Lithuania

Morocco

Netherlands

New Zealand

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Russian Federation

Serbia

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Member area provided by LTFE
COST is supported by the EU Framework Programme Horizon 2020
This website is supported by COST
28/11/2014 (Added to site)
Author(s): Son, R. S.; Smith, K. C.; Gowrishankar, T. R.; Vernier, P. T.; Weaver, J. C.

Basic Features of a Cell Electroporation Model: Illustrative Behavior for Two Very Different Pulses

Journal: Journal of Membrane Biology, 247/12 (2014), pp. 1209-1228
DOI: 10.1007/s00232-014-9699-z
Tell your friend  | 

Abstract: Science increasingly involves complex modeling. Here we describe a model for cell electroporation in which membrane properties are dynamically modified by poration. Spatial scales range from cell membrane thickness (5 nm) to a typical mammalian cell radius (10 μm), and can be used with idealized and experimental pulse waveforms. The model consists of traditional passive components and additional active components representing nonequilibrium processes. Model responses include measurable quantities: transmembrane voltage, membrane electrical conductance, and solute transport rates and amounts for the representative “long” and “short” pulses. The long pulse—1.5 kV/cm, 100 μs—evolves two pore subpopulations with a valley at ~5 nm, which separates the subpopulations that have peaks at ~ 1.5 and ~ 12 nm radius. Such pulses are widely used in biological research, biotechnology, and medicine, including cancer therapy by drug delivery and nonthermal physical tumor ablation by causing necrosis. The short pulse—40 kV/cm, 10 ns—creates 80-fold more pores, all small (~3 nm; ~1 nm peak). These nanosecond pulses ablate tumors by apoptosis. We demonstrate the model’s responses by illustrative electrical and poration behavior, and transport of calcein and propidium. We then identify extensions for expanding modeling capability. Structure-function results from MD can allow extrapolations that bring response specificity to cell membranes based on their lipid composition. After a pulse, changes in pore energy landscape can be included over seconds to minutes, by mechanisms such as cell swelling and pulse-induced chemical reactions that slowly alter pore behavior.

Supplemental Information: Supplemental Information for Basic Features of a Cell Electroporation Model: Illustrative Behavior for Two Very Different Pulses Author: Son, Reuben S.; Smith, Kyle C.; Gowrishankar, Thiruvallur R.; Vernier, P. Thomas; Weaver, James C. Available fromhttps://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/97707



Project Office

Working groups

Steering Committee

Founding members

DC Rapporteurs

Related sites: