print small

Participating Countries:

Algeria

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Belgium

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bulgaria

Croatia

Czech Republic

Denmark

Finland

France

FYR of Macedonia

Germany

Greece

Iceland

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Lithuania

Morocco

Netherlands

New Zealand

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Russian Federation

Serbia

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Member area provided by LTFE
COST is supported by the EU Framework Programme Horizon 2020
This website is supported by COST
22/11/2013 (Added to site)
Author(s): Marjanovič, I.; Kotnik, T.

An experimental system for controlled exposure of biological samples to electrostatic discharges

Journal: Bioelectrochemistry, 94 (2013), pp. 79-86
DOI: 10.1016/j.bioelechem.2013.09.001
Request reprint  |  Tell your friend  | 

Abstract: Electrostatic discharges occur naturally as lightning strokes, and artificially in light sources and in materials processing. When an electrostatic discharge interacts with living matter, the basic physical effects can be accompanied by biophysical and biochemical phenomena, including cell excitation, electroporation, and electrofusion. To study these phenomena, we developed an experimental system that provides easy sample insertion and removal, protection from airborne particles, observability during the experiment, accurate discharge origin positioning, discharge delivery into the sample either through an electric arc with adjustable air gap width or through direct contact, and reliable electrical insulation where required. We tested the system by assessing irreversible electroporation of Escherichia coli bacteria (15 mm discharge arc, 100 A peak current, 0.1 μs zero-to-peak time, 0.2 μs peak-to-halving time), and gene electrotransfer into CHO cells (7 mm discharge arc, 14 A peak current, 0.5 μs zero-to-peak time, 1.0 μs peak-to-halving time). Exposures to natural lightning stroke can also be studied with this system, as due to radial current dissipation, the conditions achieved by a stroke at a particular distance from its entry are also achieved by an artificial discharge with electric current downscaled in magnitude, but similar in time course, correspondingly closer to its entry.



Project Office

Working groups

Steering Committee

Founding members

DC Rapporteurs

Related sites: