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11/11/2013 (Added to site)
Author(s): Arena, C. B.; Mahajan, R. L.; Rylander, M. N.; Davalos, R. V.

An Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Phase Change Electrodes for Therapeutic Irreversible Electroporation

Journal: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, 135/11 (2013), pp. 111009:??-??
DOI: 10.1115/1.4025334
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Abstract: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new technology for ablating aberrant tissue that utilizes pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to kill cells by destabilizing their plasma membrane. When treatments are planned correctly, the pulse parameters and location of the electrodes for delivering the pulses are selected to permit destruction of the target tissue without causing thermal damage to the surrounding structures. This allows for the treatment of surgically inoperable masses that are located near major blood vessels and nerves. In select cases of high-dose IRE, where a large ablation volume is desired without increasing the number of electrode insertions, it can become challenging to design a pulse protocol that is inherently nonthermal. To solve this problem we have developed a new electrosurgical device that requires no external equipment or protocol modifications. The design incorporates a phase change material (PCM) into the electrode core that melts during treatment and absorbs heat out of the surrounding tissue. Here, this idea is reduced to practice by testing hollow electrodes filled with gallium on tissue phantoms and monitoring temperature in real time. Additionally, the experimental data generated are used to validate a numerical model of the heat transfer problem, which is then applied to investigate the cooling performance of other classes of PCMs. The results indicate that metallic PCMs, such as gallium, are better suited than organics or salt hydrates for thermal management, because their comparatively higher thermal conductivity aids in heat dissipation. However, the melting point of the metallic PCM must be properly adjusted to ensure that the phase transition is not completed before the end of treatment. When translated clinically, phase change electrodes have the potential to continue to allow IRE to be performed safely near critical structures, even in high-dose cases.



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