print small

Participating Countries:

Algeria

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Belgium

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bulgaria

Croatia

Czech Republic

Denmark

Finland

France

FYR of Macedonia

Germany

Greece

Iceland

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Lithuania

Morocco

Netherlands

New Zealand

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Russian Federation

Serbia

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Member area provided by LTFE
COST is supported by the EU Framework Programme Horizon 2020
This website is supported by COST
04/07/2014 (Added to site)
Author(s): Huang, K., Jiang, T.; Wang, W.; Gai, L.; Wang, J.

A Comparison of Pulsed Electric Field Resistance for Three Microorganisms with Different Biological Factors in Grape Juice via Numerical Simulation

Journal: Food and Bioprocess Technology, 7/7 (2014), pp. 1981-1995
DOI: 10.1007/s11947-014-1272-3
Request reprint  |  Tell your friend  | 

Abstract: Pulsed electric field (PEF) is a promising nonthermal food preservation technology that is based on the use of electric field to eradicate spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in food products. The effect of various biological factors on the transmembrane potential of different microorganisms (Staphyloccocus aureus, Escherichia coli DH5α, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was investigated by means of both numerical simulation and experimental method. The PEF resistance of different microorganisms in grape juice was compared by applying field strength of 12–24 kV/cm, treatment time of 30–180 μs, and an initial temperature of 30 ºC. The results showed that S. cerevisiae exhibited the least resistance to PEF treatment, E. coli DH5α the second, and S. aureus the third. The simulation results indicated that larger cells like S. cerevisiae presented the higher values of transmembrane potential and induced field strength around the cells compared to E. coli DH5α and S. aureus, which led to a less resistance to PEF treatment. The effect of cell orientation on the induced transmembrane potential was very slight (1.67 % for E. coli DH5α and 3.43 % for S. cerevisiae). The thicker cell membrane caused concentrated electric field in the cell membrane, which enhanced the sensitivity of microorganism to PEF treatment. However, both transmembrane potential and electric field strength decreased with the thickness of cell wall increasing. According to both experimental and simulation results, it was evident that there was significant difference in the inactivation rate between different microorganisms, which could be largely attributed to the biological factors of different microorganisms.



Project Office

Working groups

Steering Committee

Founding members

DC Rapporteurs

Related sites: